Xiaomin Zhou

Thursday, January 14, 2016

A Colorful Culture

In additon to the diverse ecology, rich cuisine, and wonderful coffee, Costa Rica is admired for its colorful culture. Diverse gifts, from woven hammocks to handmade ceramics, reflect this. On our way back to San Jose we stopped in Sarchi, a town referred to as Costa Rica’s handicrafts capital. Inside one of the local shops was El Galeron de los Pintores, where several local artists hand-paint intricate designs on a variety of art pieces.

Among the art on display were selections of full-size and miniature oxcarts, or carretas, decorated in an array of bright colors.  These recall traditional oxcarts used in Costa Rica during the 19th century. As the demand and production of coffee grew, carretas became the primary means to hauling goods from plantations. In the early 20th century, people began painting the carts with colorful displays. Since everything is done by hand, no two are exactly alike. Nowadays the carts are reserved for special occasions, such as the Oxcart Drivers Day held annually in Escazu.

The carretas, a national symbol, represent a unique aspect of the history of Costa Rica. The people of Costa Rica live to the motto pura vida, meaning pure life, a simple phrase with a profound meaning. The display of bright colors on arts and crafts perfectly captures the country’s vibrant culture and lifestyle. 

Monday, January 4, 2016

Yuccan Eat It, If You Wish

While exploring Lankester Botanical Gardens, we came across a Yucca tree. Yucca is a genus in the Asparagaceae family, comprising an estimated 50 species. Yucca is native throughout Central America and in parts of South America. Due to its high adaptability, yuccas are often spotted in diverse climatic and ecological conditions. Its most notable characteristics are the branching blade-like leaves and when in bloom and assortment of white flowers. The assembly of the leaves creates a canal system for water to travel to the roots for storage. Most species also encompass a dense, waxy coating that assists in preventing water loss.  

Yuccas are typically cultivated as garden and even architectural plants. The yucca flower is the national flower of El Salvador and it is often brought to cemeteries. Many parts of the yucca are edible, from the seeds to the flowers. In Costa Rica, for instance, the flowers are cooked with eggs for a traditional dish, especially during Holy Week and Easter. In Native American cultures, the roots of the Yucca elata, also known as the soaptree, are used as a shampooing agent. In other cultures, dried yucca leaves serve as a handy apparatus to start fires. Just as there are a wide variety of species in this genus, there is an equal diversity of uses by different cultures. 

Monday, December 21, 2015

Introducing Xiaomin Zhou

Hello! My name is Xiaomin Zhou and I currently study Molecular Biosciences at the University of Kansas. I am participating in the Costa Rica field biology program for the unique opportunity to expand my class-based Biology background with new experiences: living in the ecosystem, observing the live plants and animals, learning about species interactions, and the classification and identification of characters. During this course, I hope to gain insight into fieldwork and field research to broaden my understanding and appreciation of biodiversity, while exploring the tropical environments of Costa Rica. I also look forward to learning more about Central American culture because I study the Spanish language.