Abundant Biodiversity in Zurqui

Friday, June 12, 2015
Vivek Patel

Bounding Biodiversity in Zurqui

On Tuesday the ninth we visited the Zurqui field site for the second time.  This time we were going deeper into the park in order to collect specimens from various Zingiberales plants.  As Dr. Chaboo of our University of Kansas and Dr. Mauricio of the University of Costa Rica guided us deeper into the forest, they educated us on the visible biodiversity.  The site were in is labeled as a cloud forest, as its high elevation is in close contact with the clouds, prompting periodical  misting and precipitation on a daily basis.  We were walking along a steep inclined rocky road and the climate was warm and humid, perfect weather for spotting insects.  

One of the first insects of the day, a stag beetle, was spotted by John.  Never before, save Dr. Chaboo’s lab, have I seen a beetle that large.  Without even a close look, its sharpened mandibles menaced from the ground.  Dr. Mauricio advised against making contact with the insect, but a couple of students dared nonetheless and let the beetle make its way up their arms, scurrying all the while.  Since the specimen did not come from a Zingiberales, the order of  plant of our study, there was no need to collect it.  As it was let go, the beetle scurried back into the forest, and I was given my first glimpse of the breadth of taxonomic variety to come.  

On the walls we were able to see liverworts, a common name for one of the first plants to colonize land.  Dr. Chaboo reminded us that we were in the presence of one of the oldest living species of plants, also one of the first major sources of terrestrial oxygen.  This was taught to us all in introductory biology, but this on-site view of these important organisms truly gave a unique perspective on the history of life.  Everyone always seems  fascinated with dinosaurs (especially with Jurassic World coming out in theaters) and older terrestrial animals, but rarely appreciates the truly crucial importance of plants in the grand scheme of life on land.  As I continue in this field course, I will view more organisms that I’ve only ever read about, and I hope to appreciate a new perspective of their role in both history and environment.  


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image above: Dr. Chaboo showing the Biol 418 class liverworts on rock wall in Zurqui. Photograph taken by Vivek.